Apple TV For $85

Apple TV For $85

Amazon and Best Buy have the latest generation Apple TV for $85, which is pretty much as low as we’ve ever seen it go. Now featuring HBO GO. [Amazon]

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/jBHuR7AxRPc/apple-tv-85-1473100376
Category: mike tomlin   national weather service   happy halloween   Doug Martin   castle  

Chromebooks

The Chromebook is turning into the success that some thought Netbooks would achieve

Remember a few years ago when tablets hadn’t yet come onto the scene, and all the tech pundits were talking about massive growth in the Netbook market? These mostly Windows-powered computers were more portable and less expensive than traditional laptops, so there were lots of predictions for huge growth in the sector.

I was never a big believer in the idea, but that’s just because I couldn’t see the benefit of small, underpowered hardware running an OS that I felt was bloated and inefficient. My view had nothing to do with tablets, because they weren’t on the scene yet. 

We all know what happened next. Apple introduced the iPad, Android started to optimize its OS for tablets, and now we have a pretty good variety of light, cheap, efficient and net-connected mobile computers. Tablets win. Netbooks lose.

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Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/androidcentral/~3/1J4Pl7k0ZwM/story01.htm
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Newly-Engaged Adam Brody Boxes in L.A.

Clearly dedicated during No Shave November, Adam Brody headed to a boxing class in Los Angeles on Thursday (November 21).

The “O.C.” star wore a white T-shirt, red zip-up sweatshirt, and black and red shorts as he kept his untamed hair in a baseball cap.

Just the day before, reports came out that the 33-year-old star was engaged to girlfriend Leighton Meester.

First linked in February, the pair have been dating less than a year and have yet to officially confirm their engagement.

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/adam-brody/newly-engaged-adam-brody-boxes-la-1140597
Category: Adam Brody   Baylor football   Ed Lauter   kris jenner   Nothing Was The Same  

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14-Nov-2013

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Contact: Katie Steels
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-020-792-92802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine


Lower doses of the antimalarial drug primaquine are as effective as higher doses in reducing malaria transmission, according to a study published today in Lancet Infectious Diseases by London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine researchers.

Primaquine is one of the few antimalarial drugs that targets the transmission stages of the malaria parasite, the gametocytes, and is therefore considered to be an important tool for malaria elimination.

However, standard doses of the drug cause reduced blood count in individuals with a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme. This red blood cell disorder is common in malaria endemic areas, and has therefore limited the use of primaquine in malaria programmes, and prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to advise a reduction in dosage from 0.75 mg/kg to 0.25mg/kg. But until now, the efficacy of lower doses of primaquine had not been formally evaluated.

The study, carried out in Jinja, Uganda, treated G6PD-normal children with a conventional anti-malarial drug either on its own or with one of three different doses of primaquine. The subsequent carriage of malaria gametocytes was monitored for two weeks and safety outcomes were monitored for four weeks. Results showed that a dose of 0.4 mg/kg, approximately half of the previously recommended dose (0.75 mg/kg), was as effective at reducing the transmission potential of individuals with malaria.

These results establish that low dose primaquine is still effective and safe in a G6PD-normal population, and paves the way for using low-dose primaquine as a component of strategies to reduce malaria transmission and to stop the spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites.

The next step is to include the current WHO-recommended 0.25 mg/kg dose of primaquine in efficacy studies, and to test the safety of low dose primaquine in G6PD-deficient individuals.

Lead author Dr Chi Eziefula, Wellcome Trust clinical research fellow, said: “Until now, the use of primaquine was limited because of safety concerns, but lower doses had never been tested formally. These findings, that efficacy is retained at a lower dose, imply that primaquine could play an important role in malaria elimination programmes. We now need to evaluate the safety of low-dose primaquine in G6PD-deficient individuals. More questions remain to be answered regarding the best operational strategy for the deployment of primaquine to block malaria transmission.”

Co-author Professor Chris Drakeley, Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine’s Malaria Centre, said: “This work is a crucial step in the evaluation of primaquine as a malaria transmission blocking intervention. Further work is needed to show reduced infectivity to mosquitoes and to confirm the improved safety of these lower doses.”

Professor Moses Kamya of the Infectious Disease Research Collaboration in Kampala, Uganda noted: “This study provides important contemporary information that allows malaria control programmes in endemic countries in Africa to consider the use of primaquine as part of their efforts to deal with this killer disease.”

###

The study was supported by the Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and conducted within the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine’s Malaria Centre, together with collaborators at the Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration in Uganda and the Netherlands.


For more information or to request interviews, please contact the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine press office on +44(0)2079272802 or press@lshtm.ac.uk.

Notes to Editors:

Article: A C Eziefula et al. Single-dose primaquine for clearance of P. falciparum gametocytes in children with uncomplicated malaria in Uganda: a randomised controlled double-blinded dose-ranging trial. Lancet Infectious Diseases. DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70268-8

About the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine is a world-leading centre for research and postgraduate education in public and global health, with 3,500 students and more than 1,000 staff working in over 100 countries. The School is one of the highest-rated research institutions in the UK, and was recently cited as one of the world’s top universities for collaborative research. The School’s mission is to improve health and health equity in the UK and worldwide; working in partnership to achieve excellence in public and global health research, education and translation of knowledge into policy and practice. http://www.lshtm.ac.uk



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[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

14-Nov-2013

[

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Contact: Katie Steels
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-020-792-92802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine


Lower doses of the antimalarial drug primaquine are as effective as higher doses in reducing malaria transmission, according to a study published today in Lancet Infectious Diseases by London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine researchers.

Primaquine is one of the few antimalarial drugs that targets the transmission stages of the malaria parasite, the gametocytes, and is therefore considered to be an important tool for malaria elimination.

However, standard doses of the drug cause reduced blood count in individuals with a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme. This red blood cell disorder is common in malaria endemic areas, and has therefore limited the use of primaquine in malaria programmes, and prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to advise a reduction in dosage from 0.75 mg/kg to 0.25mg/kg. But until now, the efficacy of lower doses of primaquine had not been formally evaluated.

The study, carried out in Jinja, Uganda, treated G6PD-normal children with a conventional anti-malarial drug either on its own or with one of three different doses of primaquine. The subsequent carriage of malaria gametocytes was monitored for two weeks and safety outcomes were monitored for four weeks. Results showed that a dose of 0.4 mg/kg, approximately half of the previously recommended dose (0.75 mg/kg), was as effective at reducing the transmission potential of individuals with malaria.

These results establish that low dose primaquine is still effective and safe in a G6PD-normal population, and paves the way for using low-dose primaquine as a component of strategies to reduce malaria transmission and to stop the spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites.

The next step is to include the current WHO-recommended 0.25 mg/kg dose of primaquine in efficacy studies, and to test the safety of low dose primaquine in G6PD-deficient individuals.

Lead author Dr Chi Eziefula, Wellcome Trust clinical research fellow, said: “Until now, the use of primaquine was limited because of safety concerns, but lower doses had never been tested formally. These findings, that efficacy is retained at a lower dose, imply that primaquine could play an important role in malaria elimination programmes. We now need to evaluate the safety of low-dose primaquine in G6PD-deficient individuals. More questions remain to be answered regarding the best operational strategy for the deployment of primaquine to block malaria transmission.”

Co-author Professor Chris Drakeley, Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine’s Malaria Centre, said: “This work is a crucial step in the evaluation of primaquine as a malaria transmission blocking intervention. Further work is needed to show reduced infectivity to mosquitoes and to confirm the improved safety of these lower doses.”

Professor Moses Kamya of the Infectious Disease Research Collaboration in Kampala, Uganda noted: “This study provides important contemporary information that allows malaria control programmes in endemic countries in Africa to consider the use of primaquine as part of their efforts to deal with this killer disease.”

###

The study was supported by the Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and conducted within the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine’s Malaria Centre, together with collaborators at the Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration in Uganda and the Netherlands.


For more information or to request interviews, please contact the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine press office on +44(0)2079272802 or press@lshtm.ac.uk.

Notes to Editors:

Article: A C Eziefula et al. Single-dose primaquine for clearance of P. falciparum gametocytes in children with uncomplicated malaria in Uganda: a randomised controlled double-blinded dose-ranging trial. Lancet Infectious Diseases. DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70268-8

About the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine is a world-leading centre for research and postgraduate education in public and global health, with 3,500 students and more than 1,000 staff working in over 100 countries. The School is one of the highest-rated research institutions in the UK, and was recently cited as one of the world’s top universities for collaborative research. The School’s mission is to improve health and health equity in the UK and worldwide; working in partnership to achieve excellence in public and global health research, education and translation of knowledge into policy and practice. http://www.lshtm.ac.uk



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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/lsoh-ltm111413.php
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People using the transportation apps Lyft and Sidecar in California will no longer be able to skimp on their fares, now that both apps have ditched their donation model.

Sidecar said Friday it was doing away with donations and instead introducing minimum fares. The changes apply only in California and take effect Friday on iOS and Android devices.

Sidecar rival Lyft reportedly made a similar switch. It will begin requiring users in California to pay a minimum fare some time in the next few weeks, the Los Angeles Times said.

Sidecar made the change to better support its drivers, CEO Sunil Paul said in a blog post. The company has seen a 50 percent increase in driver applications since September, he said, but it has also learned from drivers that they would drive more frequently and provide longer rides if they could depend on a fair payment, Paul said.

Previously, Sidecar suggested a donation amount at the end of the ride, but riders could still pay whatever they wanted. Now, when people book a ride they will be shown a minimum payment up front. If the ride was exceptional they can still pay a higher fare if they want to.

The payment will be determined based on distance, time and traffic. Sidecar says it currently costs a little less than a regular taxi in San Francisco, and 20 percent to 40 percent less in San Diego and Los Angeles.

Sidecar is also active in Seattle, Chicago and other locations, but the relationship between riders and drivers needs to be better if the service is to go mainstream, Paul said Thursday at a conference in San Francisco. Providing a better experience for drivers will be a goal for the company going forward, he said.

Sidecar cleared a major legislative hurdle in California in September, when the state’s Public Utilities Commission approved regulations on so-called “transportation network companies,” essentially legitimizing services from companies like Sidecar and Lyft.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach’s e-mail address is zach_miners@idg.com

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Source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2064280/sidecar-and-lyft-switch-from-donations-to-minimum-fares-in-california.html#tk.rss_all
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November 13, 2013

Have you started working with Windows 8.1 yet? I’ve had it installed for months. Aside from a little Start tile (I won’t call it a button) and my Search working poorly compared to Windows 8, I haven’t noticed much of a difference. But apparently a bunch of little things are missing. Some I put in the “who cares?” category. Others may irk users who are accustomed to the OS functioning a certain way.

Case in point: Windows Easy Transfer. It’s probably not a tool you use every day, but it’s a very handy way to copy files and settings from one Windows computer to another. With Windows 8.1, it works differently. Now, it only transfers files, not settings, and only those from Windows 8.0, Windows RT, and Windows 7 — not from pre-7 editions of Windows or other Windows 8.1 computers. When I asked why the functionality was reduced, Microsoft told me, “WET is being deprecated now that many settings roam automatically and you can share data using SkyDrive.”

[ J. Peter Bruzzese says there's no free lunch, but there could be a "free" Windows. | 10 excellent new features in Windows Server 2012 R2 | For quick, smart takes on the news you'll be talking about, check out InfoWorld TechBrief -- subscribe today. ]

I don’t consider this to be a huge problem, but it made me curious about what other little details are missing or changed.

For starters, the Windows Experience Index (WEI) is MIA. This presented a score determined by the System Assessment Tool, which looked at the processor, memory, graphics, gaming graphics, and hard disk subsystems and rated each, then used the lowest number from that set as the WEI value. I never liked that because it’s not reflective of the user experience. Many geeks like me would tweak WEI’s XML file to override the score, so you could show people a really high tally on your PC to impress them — neglecting to mention that you hacked the number, of course. This was a great game at geek parties: Who has the higher WEI?

Source: http://podcasts.infoworld.com/d/microsoft-windows/solving-the-mystery-of-windows-81s-missing-features-230702?source=rss_infoworld_top_stories_
Category: jay cutler   reggie bush   The Family   Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them   Wentworth Miller  

Joe Sacco’s new book, The Great War, unfolds into a 24-foot-long panorama.

Abigail Oldham/NPR

Joe Sacco’s new book, The Great War, unfolds into a 24-foot-long panorama.

Abigail Oldham/NPR

The Great War

July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme: An Illustrated Panorama

by Joe Sacco

Hardcover, 1 accordian-fold page | purchase

Joe Sacco is a cartoonist, graphic novelist and journalist; he’s best-known for his dispatches from today’s regions of conflict, like the Middle East and Bosnia, in cartoon form. But for his latest book, The Great War, Sacco turns his eye on history. He’s recreated of one of the worst battles of World War I, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, from its hopeful beginning to its brutal end.

The book is unconventional in form — it folds out to form a 24-foot-long panorama. And while a separate author’s note provides historical context, the book itself is wordless; no dialogue, no captions.

As Sacco explains, words are not the only way to convey the immediacy of a conflict. “What I try to do with my images is just give the reader a real feel for a place,” he says. “It’s very visceral. You open the page, and you are right there in the moment.”

Finding A Way Into ‘No Man’s Land’

Sacco began drawing comics as a kid, and in college he studied journalism. When he was travelling in the Middle East, Sacco combined the two disciplines, interviewing people and drawing pictures of them as well. The result was his first book, Palestine.

As a child, Sacco was also fascinated with World War I. He remembers looking through history books and seeing phrases, like “no man’s land,” that conjured up powerful images. “To me, it meant if you entered ‘no man’s land’ you wouldn’t survive, because no man could possibly live there,” Sacco says. “Later on it sort of rolls off your tongue, but I’ve never sort of lost that sense of awe and horror.”

When a friend suggested that he draw a panorama of the Western Front, Sacco was interested, but he wanted to do something with a narrative. He remembered hearing about the first day of Battle of the Somme — an infamous story that’s been told many times.

Detail from Plate 5 of Joe Sacco’s The Great War: July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. The basilica of the town of Albert, visible in the top right, is an important staging point behind the front.

Click here to see the image at its full size.

Joe Sacco/W. W. Norton & Company

The battle began on 7:30 a.m., July 1, 1916, on the river Somme in France. There had already been a series of bombardments; British generals unloaded a week’s worth of artillery, thinking it would decimate the Germans and allow British troops to move in easily.

But while the bombardment was so loud that it could be heard in London, it hadn’t been very effective; many of the shells were duds, and others just hadn’t done the job. Then the barrage lifted, and the troops started to move. “When all that noise quieted down, the Germans realized, OK, the shelling has stopped; let’s get out of our dugouts and man our machine gun posts,” Sacco says. “The British were marching towards them in a line, and the Germans just started firing on these troops.”

Joe Sacco practices journalism through the medium of comics, communicating his eyewitness reportage in pictures. He won the American Book Award in 1996 for Palestine.

Don Usner/Courtesy of W.W. Norton & Company

Joe Sacco practices journalism through the medium of comics, communicating his eyewitness reportage in pictures. He won the American Book Award in 1996 for Palestine.

Don Usner/Courtesy of W.W. Norton & Company

By the time the day was done, the human toll was staggering: 57,470 casualties among Allied troops, and among those, more than 19,000 dead.

A Wide Panorama, Filled With Little Stories

It’s this terrible day that Sacco set out to draw in The Great War. The panorama opens with images of British General Douglas Haig as the day begins, and moves to the battle itself and its aftermath.

Sacco’s early drafting process involved determinations of scale, he says: “I did a very rough plan for it, so I knew, you know, I needed three pages to show the logistics, another three to show the troops marching up, four or five when they are in the trenches, etc. Just to give myself a sense of the rhythm before I began it.”

Joe Sacco/Courtesy of W. W. Norton & Company

Each panel in the panorama is dense and detailed. Fresh troops march in looking eager for battle. Some soldiers eat and relax, while others man the huge howitzers that fire on the Germans. Eventually troops begin advancing, and the chaos of war consumes them.

In a 1964 BBC documentary, a survivor of the battle remembered the horror: “I’d never seen so many dead men, clumped together, as what I saw then. And I thought to myself, All the world is dead. They’re all dead. They’re all dead”

Sacco says that it was important to him to include the stories of individual soldiers within larger panorama. “As I was going, I would think about the people,” he says. “You know, this one’s going to be talking to his friend, this one is going to be in pain, this one is going to be relieved — a lot of little stories that you can sort of look at and see for yourself.”

As detailed and realistic as Sacco tried to make his panorama, he knows it can merely hint at what it was really like to be on that battlefield.

“I think I captured a representation of this sort of thing, but I don’t think I can myself imagine this sort of thing properly,” he says. “This is a drawing. It’s a filter of sorts that allows me to draw and the reader to look. It’s not the real thing.”

The Battle of the Somme went on for four months. When it ended in November 1916, the allies had advanced less than 10 miles.

There were more than a million casualties on both sides.

Source: http://www.npr.org/2013/11/10/243068448/a-panorama-of-devastation-drawing-of-wwi-battle-spans-24-feet?ft=1&f=1032
Category: Dakota Johnson   OS X Mavericks   james franco   constitution day   mark sanchez  

What are the most striking features of the new version of Office Web Apps? The ones that aren’t there.

It isn’t the fact that the Save button has been nixed (shades of Google Docs!) or that multiple users can edit the same document in real time and not stomp all over each other’s work. It’s how little — as opposed to how much — variation there is between OWA and its desktop counterparts.

That small margin makes a big difference.

Better collaborative editing than the desktop
Tony Bradley at PCWorld covers in detail all the new goodies in OWA, which still consists only of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The biggest is simultaneous co-authoring: Many users can log into OWA, open the same document, and work on it simultaneously. Flags within the document tell you where each user is.

One particularly smart touch here is how Microsoft has set different levels of editing granularity for each document type. For Word, it’s a paragraph; for Excel, it’s a cell; for PowerPoint, it’s a slide. They’re good commonsense defaults, and in my conversation with Microsoft’s people, they hinted at the possibility that it could be made even more fine-grained.

From a practical standpoint, it’s unlikely two people will attempt to edit the same sentence at once. But if Microsoft can nudge the line of thinking a smidge further in that direction, it’s a sign of how completely Web apps could be able to eclipse their desktop cousins. For one, the desktop versions of these apps don’t have anything like the simultaneous-editing features found in OWA — a case where the Web app actually sports a feature superior to the desktop app.

This brings up the first of two big questions about OWA. Do Web apps need to displace their desktop counterparts?

The answer may be different depending on whether you’re asking Microsoft or end-users. End-users may enjoy the convenience of OWA, but there comes a point where OWA simply can’t deliver. The longer and more complex the document, the greater the odds OWA — or your browser — will simply gag.

There’s little question that Microsoft needs to create a product portfolio off the desktop that’s as valuable and rich as the one the company has created on it. But I doubt it can move people off desktop editions of Office and into OWA anytime soon, and not just because OWA’s feature set is lacking.

Source: http://www.infoworld.com/t/office-software/microsoft-office-web-apps-takes-great-leap-toward-office-equality-230424?source=rss_mobile_technology
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Talk to certain folks and you’d believe Oracle is doomed — doomed! Its proprietary database solutions are a prime target for being displaced by the likes of open source contenders MariaDB and PostgreSQL. It’s only a matter of time.

Sure, but the real question remains: How much time? And what will it take to make leaving Big Red behind a real proposition for an enterprise that has Java middleware, Sun servers, and Unbreakable Linux running all of the above?

The folks behind PostgreSQL and MariaDB have a lot to crow about. PostgreSQL is widely respected as an enterprise-class database, even if it doesn’t get the kind of press MySQL routinely did. One of the biggest PostgreSQL providers, EnterpriseDB, recently landed a plum spot in the Challenger Quadrant for Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Operational Database Management Systems report. I’m just as skeptical as anyone else about the value of the Magic Quadrant reports, but there’s little doubt that being featured there gets you the right kind of attention if you’re a growing company or dark horse.

MariaDB, the MySQL fork, has also been flush with successes — both strategic and financial. The company has made enough of a dent in the consciousness of the digerati that many longtime MySQL users are switching to MariaDB: Wikipedia and Google, just to name two. Given Oracle’s shabby track record with MySQL and unfriendly pricing, it’s hardly surprising.

MariaDB’s also inspired others to take MySQL and beat Oracle at its own game. To wit: Percona, who has its own edition of MySQL 5.6 that sports variants on features found in Oracle’s enterprise editions of that product. The MariaDB folks have also benefited from a $20 million infusion of cash courtesy of SkySQL.

This is all great news, but let’s not confuse any of this with a direct assault on Oracle’s customer base or business plan. These things by themselves don’t constitute displacement of Oracle, which has a staggering $37 billion revenue base as of 2013 and has even modestly goosed its profit margins across the past five years. Expecting Big Red to dry up and blow away any time soon is foolish.

Because so much of the press about Oracle revolves around its products and technologies, it’s easy to forget that Oracle is primarily a services company — one that happens to be in the market of selling its proprietary products to Fortune 100 customers. Folks like PostgreSQL and MariaDB may not be able to tear those customers away from Oracle all at once — not just because Oracle makes it difficult to leave, but because these customers are invested in Oracle as an application provider, not just a database provider.

That migration can happen in time, but it’ll take a lot more than infusions of cash and a roster of success stories from companies that would never have used Oracle in the first place. If PostgreSQL and MariaDB are serious about moving people off Oracle’s platforms, plural, they’re going to need to provide all the things Oracle does: databases, apps, and support structure. The first and third, they already do; there’s plenty of outfits from which to buy enterprise-level support for both competitors’ products or which supply migration tools.

Source: http://www.infoworld.com/t/mysql/bye-bye-big-red-escaping-oracles-not-easy-230102?source=rss_infoworld_blogs
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Being in a plane or boat that goes down in the ocean is a terrifying image that no one really ever wants to think about. But thankfully Kieran Normoyle, a final year design student, has given it some thought—lots of thought, actually—and he’s come up with a better inflatable life jacket design that protects against shock and hypothermia from freezing temperatures.

Read more…


    







Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/AK2XiQ79Qk4/a-lifejacket-that-keeps-you-from-drowning-and-freezing-1453326575
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